5 ways to fly business class

 
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We all love the pointy end of the plane… After all, Business Class is something truly special. The ability to travel to the other side of the globe, with space to work, rest and play - is something not to be taken for granted.

So how can you fly Business? There are about five ways, but none are equal in cost and value. It’s up to you to decide the best strategy:


#1 Buy a ticket with cash

Business Class on average costs 4-5 times more than an economy fare. If you got the cash and need an escape, this is your most direct option. But - it’s the most expensive by far.

Say you’re going to London from Sydney: A return ticket can set you back $8000 easily, and then sometimes more depending on the airline or dates. Then add in the consideration of the pre-tax cost, the price tag is truly greater. For example, you’re an Australian medical professional,  a senior executive or anyone doing well in their career and earning over $180k annually taxed at 45%. The pre-tax cost of the ticket is over $14,000 - that’s a lot of hours at work. Someone call the doctor - I feel nauseous!


 

#2 Redeem a full ticket with points

This is the smart way to fly and the cheapest. Our iFLYflat team can find you the reward seat too, saving you thousands of dollars per ticket, taking into account our booking fee. With the gap between economy and business class getting wider, you either pay your way up or use your points. Here’s the problem though…

A: Most Australians know how to collect points, but they don’t really know which ones to collect.

B: Many have low understanding on how to redeem the points for their true value.

C: Many cannot find the flight that they want.

The airlines and loyalty programs love points, because it’s a profitable business model for everyone. You can take your part of the value too, if you know how much your points are actually worth. The key to redeeming your points for the best value is finding a seat in business class. To do that, however, you need to know the best airline program, credit cards and actually find the seat. This is why iFLYflat exists, to make all this simple.

Using points to fly Business Or First Class is the smart way to fly - Steve Hui

Using points to fly Business Or First Class is the smart way to fly - Steve Hui

 

#3 Points Upgrade from a cash economy ticket

This is becoming a popular choice, as most airlines will email you to ‘invite you’ to bid on an upgrade. But there’s a problem: It’s not the best value for your points, and it’s not guaranteed. The airline will rank you against other members who bid for the upgrade, compare loyalty and the type of seat fare class you booked.

So if you have a good loyalty standing (Platinum!), or you booked a flexible ticket (expensive) - there’s a chance you will get upgraded. But is it really worth your points?

Considering you already had to pay cash for the economy seat. Beware: some airlines won’t even let you bid if you booked a ‘sale’ fare in economy. There’s also the chance you simply won’t get the upgrade. The airlines won’t tell you until usually 24-48 hours before the flight. If you don’t get the upgrade, it’s not the greatest news to start a journey. If you need a confirmed business class seat, don’t bid for an upgrade. Remember: It’s bidding not booking.

 

#4 Someone else pays for it: Company, Sponsors

This is the ideal choice. If your company values your productivity and sleep, they may treat you to the pointy-end of the plane. Ensure you don’t take the seat for granted, and it’s best you maximise the opportunity to get some work done onboard or rest up to hit the ground running on arrival. After all, they’re investing a lot of money for the seat, as we learned above.


 

#5 BONUS: Pretend that it’s your seat

Say you have a friend, let’s call him Jerry Seinfeld. He’s got a seat in Business or First Class. You’re stuck in economy. What do you do?! I tell you what you do… You do an Elaine Bennett!

Seinfeld jokes aside, how do you fly business class?

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Thinking about where points could take you next?
Not sure how many points you need?

 
Steve Hui1 Comment